Radon is colorless
 
Radon causes Lung Cancer
 
RADON MYTHS
 
RADON MYTHS
 
MYTH: Radon is only                     FACT: HIGH RADON LEVELS HAVE BEEN FOUND EVERY
A problem in certain                          STATE.  RADON PROBLEMS DO VARY FROM AREA TO
Parts of the country.                          AREA, BUT THE ONLY WAY TO KNOW IS TO TEST.
 
MYTH: A neighbors                        FACT:  IT’S  NOT.  RADON LEVELS CAN VARY GREATLY
Test results is a good                        FROM HOME TO HOME. THE ONLY WAY TO KNOW IT
Indication of whether                         HAS A RADON PROBLEM IS TO TEST IT.
Your home has a
Problem.
 
MYTH: Radon only                         FACT: HOUSE CONSTRUCTION CAN AFFECT RADON
Affects certain kinds                           LEVELS.  HOWEVER, RADON CAN BE A PROBLEM
Of homes.                                          IN HOMES OF ALL TYPES: OLD HOMES, NEW HOMES,
                                                          DRAFTY HOMES, INSULATED HOMES, HOMES WITH
                                                          BASEMENTS, HOMES WITHOUT BASEMENTS.  LOCAL
                                                          GEOLOGY, CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS, AND HOW
                                                          THE HOME WAS BUILT ARE ALL AMONG THE
                                                           FACTORS THAT CAN AFFECT RADON LEVELS.
 
FACTS: RADON CAN BE FOUND ALL OVER THE U.S.
Radon comes from the natural (radioactive) breakdown or uranium in soil, rock and water and gets into the air you breath.  Radon can be found all over the U.S.  It can get into any type of building--homes, offices, and schools--and result in a high indoor radon level.  But, you and your family are most likely to get your greatest exposure at home, where you spend most of your time.
 
FACTS: IEMA REPORT FINDS THAT NEARLY HALF OF 22,000 HOMES TESTED IN ILLINOIS HAD EXCESS LEVELS OF NATURALLY OCCURRING RADIOACTIVE GAS KNOWN TO CAUSE LUNG CANCER.
 
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has determined that radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the nation.  The National Academy of Sciences and the Surgeon general estimate that 21,00 radon-related lung cancer deaths occur annually in the United States, as many as 900 of those in Illinois.
 
The Illinois Emergency Management Agency (IEMA) recently verified and analyzed radon screening measurement data from 22,082 homes in the 72 of 102 Illinois counties.  Results indicate that approximately 46 percent of all homes tested had radon levels greater than the USEPA action level of 4.0 pCi/L.